The Importance of Building an Online Presence as a Writer – by Amena Begum

Gone are the days when an author would publish their work and that was that. No engagement with their readership, public appearances or glossy interviews explaining the rationale behind their produced masterpiece. That, of course, was then. The stone ages, the ancient time, call it what you will. Now, we have progressed into a modern age in which a writer’s interaction with his or her audience and the public eye is of utmost significance. Think about it. How many times a day do you scroll through social media feeds aimlessly, networking with others, and most notably updating your own social media portals for them to see? The very same principle applies to writers. They too have to make a conscious effort to create and maintain their online profiles in order to attract readership and gain public demand.

Each writer’s virtual world acts as a mechanism to depict what they are like as an individual and what their works entail and carry. When crafting your online presence, you are not just showcasing yourself as a person, but rather, you are meticulously constructing your brand. This shows your active connection with your audience and displays your key values and ideologies, which helps gain the trust and loyalty of fans. Once that has been established, your community of fans/readers can wait for your upcoming works. This reflects anticipation and shows that they are keen to commemorate and enjoy what you have written. It is vital to note that your online presence must be in action prior to your first publication so that the appropriate recognition can be built, therefore creating a greater fan following.

Above all, the craftsmanship of a successful online presence feeds into the digital world’s dynamic of strategic marketing. It is all about promotion and advertising in a nifty way to make your mark. These days, with it being so easy to track down a writer’s profile as they are only one click away from a quick Google search, it is imperative to have a lively and impactful online presence. Having sound knowledge on how to present yourself as a writer in the fast-paced online world puts your work in good stead of attaining optimum success and enables your writing career to flourish. Internet-based mediums are a fresh and candid way to gain loyalty from your desired readership and it gives them a glimpse into your world of producing publications. The ease and accessibility that it has in today’s modernity makes individuals more willing to engross themselves into the writer’s world, and keeps them wanting more. What’s not to love about that? So, online presence making is a real game-changer for any budding writer or artist. For the upcoming writers out there, now is the time to start making a name for yourselves.

Amena is a third year English Literature student who can speak English, Bengali, Hindi, and Urdu. Despite the stereotype associated to Shakespeare as being the epitome of literature, he is actually her least favourite literary figure. Her aspiration is to one day become a university lecturer.

Featured Student Blog: Travelling the World in 360

My name is Becca Arlington and in September 2018, at the age of 24, I quit my job to go travelling for six months.

I had always wanted to travel the world and, although I had initial fears about being a solo female traveller, I knew this would be the experience of a lifetime.

I was excited to see varying landscapes, encounter wild animals in their natural habitats, meet people of many other cultures, from various walks of life, and open my eyes to all the beauty, and unfortunately destruction, that this world has to offer. Cliché as it sounds, perhaps I would even find myself on a path of self-discovery.

The beautiful Lake Malawi

So, after months of planning, thirteen jabs, countless flights booked, bags on all sides to balance me out and many a visa later, I was finally ready to say my teary goodbyes to family and friends and set off on my own.

Along the way, I wrote numerous notes (as my fellow travellers can vouch for!) took 360° photos galore and snapped a mere 16,000 pictures on my camera and phone combined.

And now I am excited to be blogging about my travels. Along with the 360° pictures and interesting information, my blog posts contain breathtaking safaris, at least a million sunset pics, an abundance of culture, plenty of disasters, small triumphs, activities I won’t forget in a hurry, new friendships across the globe, beautiful sunshine, the occasional downpour, and much, much more!

View my travel blog here and follow me on my journey: https://travellingtheworldin360.blog

So I hope you enjoy reading my ramblings and seeing my snaps as I take you with me on my travels through Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Dubai, India, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia.

View my first 360° virtual tour of the Serengeti National Park here!

If you would like to see your blog featured on Brunel Writer, email us at brunelwriter@gmail.com with a brief introduction about yourself and your content.

Guest blogger Lucy Hunt, Winner of the Brunel English writing prize 2018-19

Congratulations to Theatre and English undergraduate Lucy Hunt who is the overall Winner in this year’s English writing prize at Brunel University London.

Read on for Lucy’s guest blog:

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image copyright Dominion Theatre / Bat Out Of Hell The Musical

I would do anything to watch Bat Out of Hell again (and I would do that!)

by Lucy Hunt

EnglishBlogPicture2It is safe to say I was a ‘bat out of hell’ when tickets went on sale for Jim Steinman’s award-winning musical at the Dominion Theatre earlier this year. If the large, fiery motorbike towering over the entrance isn’t enough of a hint, this musical is loud, excessive, and it’s batshit crazy!

Since its opening, Bat Out of Hell has received divided opinion due to its lack of conformity to a typical musical – instead, it seems more like a fairy-tale being held hostage by a rock concert. It centres on Strat, the forever eighteen-year-old leader of a group of mutants called “The Lost” whose DNA froze during a chemical war, causing them to stay young for ever. Raven, who later becomes Strat’s love interest, is locked away in her room by her father Falco, the ruler of the dystopian land of Obsidian. If Peter Pan and Rapunzel didn’t just pop into your head, you will probably be amongst the confused half of critics who don’t understand the unusual yet captivating style this musical takes on.

The jarred storyline is matched by the equally jarred yet extraordinary cinematography that director Jay Scheib brings to the musical. Throughout certain scenes of the show, cameramen are on stage and the actors perform to the camera rather than the audience. As the video is projected across the backdrop, so much is going on in all parts of the stage. It is this futuristic style that makes this musical so different but refreshing for the theatre industry. It brings the advantages of the cinema into the theatre, exploiting the strengths of both movie-making and theatre to create an explosive masterpiece.

EnglishBlogPicture3It would be wrong to write a musical review without picking up on the vocals, especially in BOOH. It is no secret Meatloaf’s songs are hard to sing, especially when having to jump around and act at the same time. But the cast of Bat Out of Hell deliver no faults. No matter the opinion on the musical, every critic has praised the talents of the entire cast. Andrew Polec deserves particular praise as he tackles eight belting tunes, such as “I would do anything for love”, each night and leaves the audience roaring with applause. But Rob Fowler and Sharon Sexton, who play Raven’s parents, steal the show with an electric duet of “Paradise by the Dashboard Light”. These songs that are known to be individually ludicrous and comical, surprisingly appear to come together and make sense.

As a jukebox musical would do, BOOH will attract people who may never have been to the theatre, or people who have never heard of Meatloaf’s songs. Either way, this musical provides a fun, jolted experience that makes you so unsure, but at the same time love what you’re watching. It has something for everyone – from comedic moments, to epic ballads; from a Romeo and Juliet vibe, to songs that make you want to get up and sing at the top of your lungs (but it is theatre etiquette not to!).

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Lucy Hunt
is a Brunel Theatre and English student, from Northampton, who spends most of her money on musicals and Disneyland trips. Her biggest achievement is being away from her cat this long whilst at University, and aspires to do anything in life that permits her to break into song and dance in the middle of the street.

Guest blogger Tyri Donovan, runner-up in the English writing prize 2018-19

Congratulations to English with Creative Writing undergraduate Tyri Donovan who was a runner-up in this year’s English writing prize at Brunel University London.

Click here to read Tyri’s blog entry!
(opens in PDF)

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Tyri Donovan
refers himself as a diligent, open minded person of mixed ethnicity – British, Jamaican, Egyptian. Family, Friends, Music and Athletics drives his creativity and passion towards Art, whilst global interactions of langauge engage and educate him within international cultures. Tyri views culture with integrity, respect and sensitivity, as he continues to learn and grow through the interest of people’s own culture experiences.

Guest blogger Shania King-Soyza, runner-up in the English writing prize 2018-19

Congratulations to Film Studies and English undergraduate Shania King-Soyza who was a runner-up in this year’s English writing prize at Brunel University London.

Read on for Shania’s blog entry!

Being a Black British Girl Uninspired by Meghan Markle

by Shania King-Soyza

 

The façade of Meghan Markle’s acceptance into the Royal Family continues to reinforce Eurocentric standards for black women: civilised, dignified, thin, pale and modest are stereotypical characteristics black women are internally conflicted to appeal to. The idea of Markle opposing this standard is improbable…I thought she was white?

Within a BBC article, black British women commented that Markle’s presence “empowered” them as they caught a glimpse of optimism for diversity – she can “introduce black culture to the Royals” they said. Personally, the idea of a black princess dutty wining her way down the aisle, fresh curls popping through her veil as the wedding party feast on curry goat and plantain, and dance to ‘Candy’ is a bit unrealistic…I mean just a bit. However, if she can indeed project positivity and confidence as these women suggest, then who am I to critique their reactions? Some say her marriage is as momentous as Barak Obama becoming president – therefore she must be significant.

Although, it still doesn’t make sense to me…

Genetically and culturally, Markle does not characterise an average black British woman:

Genetically – Markle is biracial and has never referred to herself as a black woman as (rightfully so) she accepts both her cultures and prefers not to reject either. Markle’s complexion is very fair (almost an olive skin tone); she has straight hair, thin lips and nose – she is a very beautiful woman, yet she shouldn’t be idolised by young black girls. The reality of black women being able to see a representation of themselves in such a hierarchy as the Royal Family is still non-existent, as Markle continues to follow the mainstream, Eurocentric standard of beauty. Being able to see a black princess is still confined to Disney as Markle isn’t a Tiana (2009) – though perhaps a Cinderella (1950)?

Culturally – she was born and raised in America – a vastly different environment. Though American culture is highly influential worldwide (affecting Britain massively), she has not experienced the best of British culture– I mean…does she even like Sunday roast dinners? Dead ass. Not all middle- and working-class British women can relate to Markle’s upbringing (or the life she lives now) because it wasn’t British. She didn’t go to Morley’s after Secondary school; she can’t go to Morley’s now – so in what way is she relatable? Sure, anyone can wear outdated clothes, be a philanthropist and besties with the Queen…right?

Meghan Markle does not inspire me. She’s different and that’s okay.

There are many black British women to idolise and feel empowered by such as Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Letitia Wright, Beverly Knight, Emeli Sandé and Estelle. Rich in melanin and black-girl-magic, they can truly inspire the younger generation to love their skin and prosper. The ‘Markle Effect’ is purely a façade of black excellence trying to infiltrate the monarchy. Uninspiring and improbable, she does not represent me…a black British girl.

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Shania King-Soyza identifies as a black girl though her ethnicity is mixed – Barbados and Sri Lanka.  Location and family influence her perception on current affairs. Though she describes herself as unpatriotic, she embraces British culture and is committed to exposing what life is truly like for those whose voices are often unheard.