21 Miles Publishing Opportunity

Short poetry on the themes of migrants and refugees is sought for a new photobook by Brunel University photographer and artist, Chris Dundon-Smith. Brunel University is currently supporting Chris on the photojournalism project, 21 Miles. The photobook and poetry will form part of a multi-media installation at Ambika P3 Gallery in London (Nov 2022) and will then go on tour at a selection of galleries in 2023.

21 Miles is a multimedia documentary project that aims to describe the experience of the perilous twenty-one-mile journey across the English Channel, made by those seeking safety and asylum in the United Kingdom.

The video and audio installation uses a single photograph taken in the middle of the English Channel and combines it with over 400 smart-phone audio recordings taken from actual Chanel crossings, and the artist’s own recordings while on location.

In addition, the video installation is supported by a photobook that focuses on the physical and emotional signs and traces this demanding and terrifying journey leaves behind.

Some of the work can be viewed here.

https://chrisdundonsmith.myportfolio.com/21-miles

This is a non-profit passion project to raise awareness of the current situation and dangers facing people crossing the English Channel. Unfortunately, this is not a paid opportunity and very much aimed at those seeking to contribute to the cause due to an interest in the project or in writing poetry on the subject. There will however be the opportunity to feature in the photobook and the installation, and attend shows, as the work tours after the Ambika P3 show. There will also be a copy of the photobook provided to any successful applicants.

The poetry can be already existing work on these themes, or something new based on the work itself. The deadline for submitting will be 4th October 2022.

For more information, please contact Chris:

chris.dundon-smith@brunel.ac.uk

Thank you.

The Brunel Writer Prize 2022

Every year, The Brunel Writer Prize is awarded to the student with the highest graded article submission for the Creative Industries module on Brunel University’s Creative Writing Programme. This year’s winner is Nathalie Brundell who provides creative writers with some useful tips on the thorny issue of transferring fictional characters from one’s imagination to the page. Congratulations Nathalie!

Hearing Voices? Fear not, Writer

Like a search history filled with creative torture techniques, a writer with voices in their head is usually a good thing. 

Usually.

But sometimes, those voices can get a little too loud. We’ve all been there. Scented candles burning, movie scores playing softly, a steaming cup of your favourite drink – yeah, you’re ready. In fact, your fingers are itching, so you open the document and… 

There it is. The dreaded, blank page. And that blinking cursor – the worst torture technique discovered yet. Well? Come on, then, it says. Show me what you got. I can do this aallll day

As the seconds pass, your palms grow sweaty. Maybe… Maybe you’re not cut out for this, after all. You can’t even come up with one sentence that doesn’t sound like complete, utter garbage. And what if people hate it? Who could blame them – you have no clue what you’re doing! And…

Yeah – those voices.

Of course, none of the garbage they spew is actually true. It’s just fear, worry, perfectionism – whatever you want to call it. And while that ancient reptile brain of yours is just trying to protect you from excruciating, public shame… it’s also keeping you from actually writing.

In other words – you wanna finally finish a manuscript? Here’s how to beat those nasty voices in your head.

1. Create a Character

If there’s one thing we writers love, it’s a flawed character. So, get to it – give that shrill voice a name, a face, a personality. Who are they, and what are they afraid of?

Like that voice that just won’t stop criticizing you. Let’s call him Curt, shall we? Can you see those thin glasses he’s wearing, and that slick, villainous suit? Looking down at literally everyone?

Well, look closer. Maybe, someone told him long ago that the only way to make your way in the world is through perfection. Flaws and weaknesses? He sniffs them out like a trained dog, because if he can keep pointing out other people’s faults, maybe he doesn’t have to deal with his own. 

A pure ray of sunshine.

But I’m sure you can do even better than that. So, crack open your notebook. You don’t have what it takes. People will hate it. Your dream is silly and embarrassing. Who are the people saying these things, and why?

Take your time with it, and make it good – after all, you’ll be seeing a lot of these guys in the future

2. Make Friends

Alright, so you’ve got your characters. Now what? 

Curt, the haughty, judgy critic. Selma, the middle-aged woman with enough worries to give her a heart attack. Gordon, the “lazy” slug who would rather scroll social media, because if he actually tries something he might just fail at it. 

Shake hands, acknowledge them. These people aren’t going anywhere, so there’s no point ignoring them anymore. Instead, get comfortable around them. 

3. Take Back Authority

These flat, nasty characters – are they the ones writing the book, poem, script? No. You are. 

So, establish your authority. They can stay, sure, but they better know their place.

They likely won’t back down at first. But in time, you’ll learn how to recognize who is speaking, and how to talk them off their ledge. Selma, for example, probably just needs someone to settle her nerves – some kindness and reassurance goes a long way. 

Curt, on the other hand, just needs to be told to shut up every once in a while. And Gordon? No distractions for him. That comfort zone really is his kryptonite.

In other words, put them in their place. ‘Cause if you can learn how to take control over those inner voices?

You’ll finish that manuscript in no time.

Nathalie Brundell is a Swedish writer currently living in London. In daylight, she pays the bills as a copywriter working with sustainability-focused brands, but after dark, you’ll find her typing away at her first fantasy novel in the glaring blue light of her screen. Her work has previously been published in the Myths, Monsters & Mayhem anthology, a #1 anthology release on Amazon.

The Good Literary Agency Prize 2022

The Creative Writing team at Brunel is thrilled to announce The Creative Writing Prize in partnership with the Good Literary Agency. The prize is open to all Brunel MA Creative Writing students who are submitting their dissertation projects in 2022. The Good Literary Agency is a social enterprise literary agency dedicated to increasing opportunities for representation for all writers under-represented in mainstream publishing including writers of colour, disability, LGBTQ+, working class and anyone else who feels like their story isn’t being told in mainstream publishing.

We at TGLA are absolutely thrilled to be partnering with the MA in Creative Writing at Brunel University. As literary agents on the lookout for a diverse range of fiction & non-fiction, we are excited about the wealth of literary talent coming out of Brunel University. We hope we can provide invaluable industry insight that will equip the students with knowledge to take forward into their careers in publishing, and hope this is an amazing opportunity for the 2022 winner.”

Kemi Ogunsanwo at TGLA

The partnership comprises three key stages:

1. Demystifying Publishing

This online event in March will provide students with the opportunity to hear details about the book publishing industry and ask questions of TGLA agents. The event will also be open to Brunel third year BA single and joint honours Creative Writing students.  

 2. Pitch Session

MA students will be given the opportunity to pitch their work to an agent from TGLA. Each student will have approximately ten minutes to pitch their work and receive feedback or ask questions.

3. Sample submission

Students are invited to submit the first three chapters of their novel or memoir (to a maximum of 8000 words) with a one page synopsis. A shortlist of candidates will be drawn up before the winner is confirmed, likely just before Christmas 2022.

The Good Literary Agency Prize winner 2022 will receive:

  • A full manuscript read (should they decide to complete the book)
  • A comprehensive set of editorial notes
  • A 1 on 1 session with an agent
  • The potential to be offered representation by TGLA once the manuscript is completed

TGLA website: https://www.thegoodliteraryagency.org/

Brunel MA in Creative Writing programme: https://www.brunel.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/creative-writing-ma

Spring 2022: Brunel Writers Series

All events are online and FREE but please register via the links provided below

09.02.22: WRITING MOTHERHOOD – CLAIRE LYNCH AND PENNY WINCER IN CONVERSATION

Join Claire Lynch and Penny Wincer as they ask, why writing about motherhood matters? Claire and Penny will share their own experiences of writing about motherhood in memoir and non-fiction and discuss why challenging mainstream definitions of motherhood is so important in their work.

Claire Lynch is the author of Small: On Motherhoods. Her personal essays have appeared in the Washington Post and on BBC Radio 4. She is a Professor of English Literature at Brunel University London.

Penny Wincer is a Melbourne born, London dwelling, author, podcaster and non-fiction book coach. After 15 years as a freelance interiors photographer, Penny began writing about life as a single parent and unpaid carer whilst juggling a freelance creative career. She has written for Red Magazine, iPaper and regularly contributes to The Telegraph. Penny’s first book Tender was published by Coronet Books in 2020. She co-hosts the podcast Not Too Busy To Write.

Please register for the Penny Wincer event: HERE…

23.02.22: WRITING CLASS – DAVID ELDRIDGE AND HELEN CULLEN IN CONVERSATION

Regarded as one of the most important contemporary playwriting voices, David Eldridge will be in conversation with Helen Cullen, author and Brunel lecturer, about his journey to becoming one of Britain’s most successful playwrights, his creative process and writing about class for the theatre.

David Eldridge: Described as a “a poet of the east end overspill” by the Observer, David Eldridge is widely regarded as one of the prominent playwriting voices of his generation, whose productions have premiered across the UK at venues including The National, The Royal Court, The Royal Exchange and The Donmar. Television credits include the The Scandalous Lady W for BBC 2, and Our Hidden Lives, a BBC adaption of the Simon Garfield novel.

Helen Cullen has published two novels to date, The Lost Letters of William Woolf (2018) and The Truth Must Dazzle Gradually (2020) with Penguin Random House in Ireland and the UK and in the USA by Harper Collins. The novels have also sold in translation to numerous foreign markets and been optioned for TV adaptations. Helen’s debut novel also garnered her a Best Newcomer nomination at the 2018 Irish Book Awards. Helen is currently completing a PhD on Creative and Critical Writing at UEA and is a member of the creative writing faculty at Brunel University. She is a regular contributor to the the Sunday Times and is an Irish Times literary critic. You can find her on socials as @wordsofhelen.

Please register for the David Eldridge event: HERE

16.03.22 WRITING MIGRATION – DAVID HERD AND WILLIAM WATKIN IN CONVERSATION

Poet, academic, and activist Prof. David Herd will be in conversation with Prof. William Watkin about his ground-breaking Refugee Tales project. They will be discussing how David has used creative practice and public spectacle as a constructive form of protest and celebration, and how his many years of working around issues of migration have impacted in his remarkable poetry.

David Herd’s books of poems include All Just, Outwith, Through, Songs from the Language of a Declaration, and Walk Song (forthcoming from Shearsman). His essays and poems have been widely published in magazines, journals and newspapers and his recent writings on the politics of human movement have appeared in From the European South, Los Angeles Review of Books, Paideuma, and the Times Literary Supplement. He is Professor of Modern Literature at the University of Kent and a co-organiser of the project Refugee Tales.

Prof. William Watkin is one of the leading voices in contemporary philosophy today and professor of contemporary philosophy and literature at Brunel University. William is very widely published with seven monographs to his name, including the recent Bioviolence: How the powers that be make us do what they want (2021). When he is not making the world a better place through philosophy, William is also a journalist, blogger, vlogger and painter.

Please register for the David Herd event: HERE

Calling all budding designers: Book Cover Design Competition #Horror #SciFi #Fantasy

Brunel University London’s English & Creative Writing department is producing its second Horror, Science-fiction & Fantasy anthology entitled:

‘WIZARDS, WEREWOLVES & WEIRD ENGINES’

The anthology features a range of English & Creative Writing students’ short stories and non-fiction writing and launches in Autumn 2018.

The competition for the cover design is open to all Brunel University London Undergraduate students and as well as seeing your design used on all copies of the book (in paperback & ebook) you can win 5 paperback copies of the book. Plus if you’re an aspiring graphic designer it’s a great addition to your CV.

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Last year’s anthology ‘Faeries, Fiends & Flying Saucers‘ made the Top 3 S/F new releases on Amazon.

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And we presented ‘Game of Thrones’ author George RR Martin with his very own copy!

The anthology includes three distinct genres –

Horror
Science fiction
Fantasy

– as the title ‘WIZARDS, WEREWOLVES & WEIRD ENGINES’ suggests. So let your imagination run wild!

The design needs to be:

  • High-resolution, 300 dpi .tif/.jpg format OR vector eps format.
  • Size: A5 (148x210mm) plus a spine on the left (17x210mm).
  • Please keep back-up copies of your working files so if you win they can be easily edited.

Entries must be submitted by:
Monday 18th June
by 5pm

to Mr Frazer Lee via email (frazer.lee@brunel.ac.uk) with the subject header:
‘WIZARDS, WEREWOLVES & WEIRD ENGINES’

Good luck & happy designing!

Volunteer Opportunity in India for Arts Students

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CHARITY PROJECT

Who?

Volunteer Invest is the Arms Around the Child volunteer and study abroad programme. They are a global charity supporting communities and human rights organisations in Ghana, India and South Africa, where they support the development and progression of children under their care.

What?

Their partner charity in India is looking for filming, music, photography, painting, drama and performing art students willing to share their talent, creative ideas and skills with groups of children in Jaipur. The arts are a great way to help children unwind and express their emotions and frustrations, it also teaches them valuable communication and life skills.

This is a very creative and entrepreneurial opportunity. Plan the Project you would like to work on and how the can children be involved. Present your idea, and your suggestions can be based on age, culture and differences.

This opportunity is available for a group of students willing to come together and create a production or individual artists. See this example from film student Reuben, who travelled to Jaipur and recorded two short documentaries about the lives of the children at the care facility.

When?

Applications open all year around, but the main focus is on summer 2018, or for final major project/show research.

Your final film could be used to showcase and fundraise for the NGO in Jaipur and the work they do. Previous volunteers have had their work shown across multiple global charity networks, at music festivals and at film awards.

At this time we are unable to fund students, but have access and knowledge for fundraising and have helped hundreds of students travel around the world. You will be required to cover your living costs and in-country expenses.
This is a great opportunity for students to work with a very established charity and work with different social and cultural contexts in a beautiful country.

Interested students to contact: volunteer@armsaroundthechild.org

For more details, visit: http://volunteerinvest.org

 

Postgraduate Anthology

Calling all Brunel Creative Writing postgraduate students & alumni…  

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Building on the success of our recent Creative Writing anthologies, a group of postgraduate MA Novel students, under the guidance of Professor Bernardine Evaristo, are putting together an anthology comprised of work collected from MA and PhD students who have graduated since winter 2012, including current students. The anthology will focus on collecting the opening chapters/sections of your manuscripts in a bid to get them noticed by industry professionals, agents and publishers. We are open to submissions from anyone who is currently studying as a postgraduate Creative Writing student at Brunel or has completed an MA or PhD with us from winter 2012.

Please follow this link for further details from student anthology editor, Hadiyah Khan.